Nathaniel Remez, Corps de Ballet, on The Little Mermaid

Nathaniel Remez, corps de ballet, discusses his life and career with Senior Manager, Individual Giving, Ari Lipsky, with a special emphasis on the role of the Poet in John Neumeier’s The Little Mermaid.

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Header image: Nathaniel Remez in Pita’s Björk Ballet  // © Erik Tomasson

SF Ballet School Spring Festival Highlights

San Francisco Ballet School launches its first annual Spring Festival, May 22–24, 2019. Formerly known as Student Showcase, the SF Ballet School Spring Festival will include three nights of performances, an opening night dinner, and new interactive activities with opportunities to learn about ballet.

Each of the three performances will feature different programming. All will include a short demonstration by students in Levels 2–8, choreographed by SF Ballet School Faculty member Karen Gabay. This demonstration will be followed by upper-level students and Trainees performing SF Ballet School Artistic Director Helgi Tomasson’s Ballet d’Isoline, a new work choreographed by AXIS Dance Company Artistic Director Marc Brew, excerpts from Jiří Kylián’s Sarabande and Falling Angels, and premieres by SF Ballet School student choreographers. 

Highlights from last year’s Student Showcase, including works by George Balanchine, Karen Gabay, Blake Johnston, and Helgi Tomasson

Proceeds from the May 22 Spring Festival Dinner, to be held at the Four Seasons San Francisco, will support the more than $1 million in scholarships and financial aid the School distributes each year so that talented students, regardless of family circumstances, can have a chance to study dance.


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Header photo: San Francisco Ballet School Students performing a demonstration in the 2018 Student Showcase // © Lindsay Thomas

Marc Brew Creates quicksilver on SF Ballet School Trainees

By Hannah Young

The premiere of Marc Brew’s quicksilver introduced more than just new choreography to SF Ballet School students. Drawing from his personal experiences and professional ballet training, Brew—the artistic director of AXIS Dance Company and an acclaimed choreographer who uses a wheelchair—spent several weeks with SF Ballet School Trainees, introducing new ways to think about choreography. First shown on March 13 at SF Ballet’s free Student Matinee and returning for the School’s Spring Festival May 22–24, the six-person ballet resulted from an unconventional movement exploration.

Brew’s unique method for creating choreography pushed the Trainees both technically and creatively. “I wanted to share my process with the students, being aware that this is probably the first time that they’ve worked with a disabled choreographer,” he explained, “I bring some material, an upper body arm phrase, and then ask them to see how they could move the rest of their body.” Prescribing movement for the upper body and asking the dancers to create accompanying movement for the lower body was a new choreographic prompt for the students.

During the creation process, Brew guided the students to consider different physical perspectives. “When I went through ballet school, I was never exposed to anyone with a disability,” Brew said. “The fact that I’m in the studio with them, and working with them, hopefully will change those perceptions around what a dancer is and what it means to be a dancer.” He also challenged the common narrative of an injury ending a dancer’s relationship with dance: “If one day they got injured, maybe that doesn’t mean you just have to sit on the side—maybe there are other ways you can explore.”

SF Ballet School Trainees rehearsing Marc Brew’s quicksilver // © Alexander Reneff-Olson

Brew spent three weeks with the Trainees, helping them find new ways to create movement. By asking a diverse range of artists to engage with the students, SF Ballet School commits to providing an education that not only develops technical prowess but also prioritizes personal innovation. Experiences like these are how students learn a skill imperative to creative success—how to cultivate their own aesthetic and voice.

Experiences like these are only possible with community engagement. We invite you to join us in supporting diverse artistic voices by donating today. Your gift, no matter the size, is critical to bringing in dancers of all backgrounds to nourish the artistic growth of our students.


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Header photo: San Francisco Ballet School student rehearsal with Marc Brew // © Alexander Reneff-Olson